Image: East Palestine residents report headaches, anger and “burning skin” following train incident



(Natural News)
Sickness is spreading throughout East Palestine, Ohio, following the Norfolk Southern train derailment earlier this month.

Locals say they continue to suffer from burning skin and constant headaches, and they worry about the risk of longer-term health problems like cancer. (Related: Check out our earlier coverage about how the controlled explosion of train cars in East Palestine created the largest dioxin plume in world history.)

According to Gov. Mike DeWine, a creek near East Palestine is still “severely contaminated” despite repeated claims by officials that air and drinking water quality are just fine. The Brandon regime is also deploying a team of toxicologists to assess the site.

One resident named Nadine Lucie Straile who does not live in East Palestine says she developed a horrible headache and burning skin not long after eating at a Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurant on February 7 near the site of the controlled explosion.

“That night my eyes started burning like never before and then a horrible headache came on,” Straile told Sputnik. “My lips, tongue and throat, nasals were burning … a day later I started tingling all over my body.”

Straile’s neighbors, who live about 20 miles away from the site of the wreckage, are experiencing similar symptoms, possibly due to wind spreading the toxic chemicals far beyond the town into the greater region.

“This was not a neuropathy tingling. A different type, even my breast. My neighbors are experiencing some of the same symptoms,” Straile added. “My blood pressure went sky high, probably from the pain, the ER said.”

Brighteon.TV

Is East Palestine unlivable?

Another local resident named Heather Ann who lives about four miles from East Palestine says she, too, is suffering from constant headaches, a burning skin sensation, difficulty breathing, and sinus issues ever since the derailment.

“The smell is gone now but it was noticeable the week it happened and the air felt difficult to breathe,” she said. “My dog was also coughing the day it happened.”

Ann is skeptical about the government’s claims that everything is a-okay in East Palestine, a very limited area of which was evacuated and for just a very short time following the incident.

“They only evacuated 1 mile and then two miles out but we are four miles away and had symptoms,” Ann explained to the media.

“I don’t understand why they didn’t evacuate a further radius. Or why they are saying it’s all safe. I noticed the water in town no longer looks as clean and had a strange film on top.”

Luke Galvan, another local resident, added that the whole experience has felt like a movie. This is hardly surprising, seeing as how the 2022 Netflix movie “White Noise” predicted all of this, almost verbatim.

Filmed almost entirely in Northeast Ohio, White Noise is set in East Palestine, but in 1985. It features a train derailment, explosion, and toxic release scenario that is an almost carbon copy of what actually occurred there in real life this month – and some East Palestine residents even participated as extras in the film.

“My wife and I were like everybody from town, kind of looking at the spectacle of the train burning,” Galvin said. “Nobody thought that it was going to be as big as what it was.”

When Galvin evacuated his mother’s house about six miles away from the site of the explosion, his symptoms went away – but only temporarily.

“We went back into town a few times to try to take care of the cats and stuff, and I get the same deal … my eyes burning, kind of the same thing that I felt,” he said.

The latest news about the situation in East Palestine can be found at Disaster.news.

Sources for this article include:

SputnikNews.com

NaturalNews.com

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